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Unexpected Death of a Mannequin: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study on Relationships of Stress, Anxiety, and Resilience on Learning Outcomes

  • Author Footnotes
    1 The corresponding author conducted the research while a PhD student at East Carolina University. He is now affiliated with Beaufort County Community College as the Dean of Nursing and Allied Health: 5337 Highway 264 East, Washington, N.C. 27889 USA [email protected]
    Kent Dickerson
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author:
    Footnotes
    1 The corresponding author conducted the research while a PhD student at East Carolina University. He is now affiliated with Beaufort County Community College as the Dean of Nursing and Allied Health: 5337 Highway 264 East, Washington, N.C. 27889 USA [email protected]
    Affiliations
    East Carolina University College of Nursing, Department of Nursing Science, Health Sciences Building, Greenville, NC, 27858-4353 USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    2 Please note, Dr. Laura Gantt was the corresponding author's dissertation chair. She is also an assistant editor for Clinical Simulation in Nursing. While we do not feel this presents a conflict of interest, we felt it prudent to specifically bring this to your attention.
    Laura T. Gantt
    Footnotes
    2 Please note, Dr. Laura Gantt was the corresponding author's dissertation chair. She is also an assistant editor for Clinical Simulation in Nursing. While we do not feel this presents a conflict of interest, we felt it prudent to specifically bring this to your attention.
    Affiliations
    Nursing Support Services, East Carolina University College of Nursing, Health Sciences Building, Greenville, NC, 27858-4353 USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Melvin Swanson
    Affiliations
    East Carolina University College of Nursing, Department of Nursing Science, Health Sciences Building, Greenville, NC, 27858-4353 USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 The corresponding author conducted the research while a PhD student at East Carolina University. He is now affiliated with Beaufort County Community College as the Dean of Nursing and Allied Health: 5337 Highway 264 East, Washington, N.C. 27889 USA [email protected]
    2 Please note, Dr. Laura Gantt was the corresponding author's dissertation chair. She is also an assistant editor for Clinical Simulation in Nursing. While we do not feel this presents a conflict of interest, we felt it prudent to specifically bring this to your attention.
Published:October 02, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecns.2022.08.010

      Highlights

      • Mixed methods design proved feasible for studying an unexpected death simulation.
      • Resilience scores showed a large negative correlation with anxiety scores.
      • Twenty seven percent of participants noted they had never experienced human death.

      Abstract

      Background

      Although simulation increases competencies in end of life care, unexpected death simulations are often avoided due to student stress and anxiety. This pilot study aimed to determine a protocol for studying relationships of stress, anxiety, and resilience on student learning outcomes during an unexpected death simulation.

      Method

      A mixed methods design used demographics, resilience scores, anxiety scores, competency measurements, and one-on-one interviews to study the variables.

      Results

      Paired samples t-test of state anxiety scores showed a statistically significant increase from the baseline measurement to immediately after the simulated death. Large negative correlations were found between baseline resilience and state anxiety scores, and between baseline resilience and trait anxiety scores. Interview responses indicated that multiple factors lead to students experiencing stress and anxiety.

      Conclusion

      The procedures and methods were appropriate for studying the variables. Correlations between resilience and anxiety scores indicated that maximum sampling variation may be beneficial when choosing interview participants.

      KEYWORDS

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