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An Educational Intervention to Improve Simulation Facilitation by Nurse Educators in a Large Canadian Academic Hospital: A Mixed Methods Evaluation

Published:February 12, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecns.2021.01.001

      Highlights

      • A high-quality, evidence-based simulation facilitation curriculum that required no additional financial support was effective at improving the quality of debriefings by nurse educators at an academic health care organization.
      • Use of a “Champion” model contributes to the sustainability of an educational program.
      • The translation of simulation facilitation knowledge can effectively be assessed using the Observational Structured Assessment of Debriefing tool.

      Abstract

      Background

      Best practices in simulation-based education indicate that sessions should be facilitated by a trained simulation instructor. A large academic Canadian hospital required instructors to facilitate simulation-based education in a corporate nursing orientation program.

      Method

      The Plan-Do-Study-Act framework was used to develop a simulation facilitation curriculum using mixed methods to evaluate the program.

      Results

      The mean scores on the Observational Structured Assessment of Debriefing tool were greater than the target of three out of five. Themes identified from the qualitative analysis focused on a safe learning environment and use of a framework for debriefing.

      Conclusion

      A simulation faculty development curriculum for nurse educators with support from peers improved the quality of debriefing in a corporate nursing orientation program.

      Keywords

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