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Development and Feasibility Testing of a Patient Safety Research Simulation

Published:December 11, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecns.2017.09.007

      Highlights

      • Understanding nurse safety behavior in response to interventions is critical.
      • Nurse safety behavior is difficult to manipulate, observe, and analyze in situ.
      • Simulation allows intervention testing without risking patients or disrupting care.
      • A simulation platform was built to test the impact of patient safety interventions.
      • The simulation was found to be realistic and feasible for use in safety research.

      Abstract

      Background

      It is critical to understand but difficult to study nursing behavior in response to safety interventions.

      Methods

      A common nursing scenario, evidence based on appropriate nursing actions in response to patient safety risks, and a corresponding measure of nursing behavior, the Safety Action Performance Scale, were developed. These tools were content validated and tested for feasibility.

      Results

      The scenario was low-cost, realistic, and successfully used in a mixed-method pilot study. The Safety Action Performance Scale was easy to use and revise for greater interrater reliability.

      Conclusion

      Simulation provides a feasible means for testing safety interventions to improve safety-oriented behavior and subsequent patient outcomes.

      Keywords

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